CCNP Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (TSHOOT v2.0) v1.0 (300-135)

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Total 147 questions

Instructions -
The main screen consists of two parts; the Main scenario and the Topology tabs. The main scenario describes TSHOOT.com test bed. The Topology tabs allow you to display the appropriate and select the trouble ticket.
To complete the item, you will first need to familiarize yourself with the TSHOOT.com test bed by clicking on the master scenario first and then the topologies tabs.
Once you are familiar with the test bed and the topologies, you should start evaluating the trouble ticket. You will be presented with a Trouble Ticket scenario that will describe the fault condition. You will need to determine on which device the fault condition is located, to which technology the fault condition is related, and the solution to each trouble ticket. This will be done by answering three questions.

Ticket Selection -
To begin, click on the Ticket on the Topology tabs.
Some of the questions will require you to use the scroll bar to see all options.
Please note.

Fault Isolation -
Read the ticket scenario to understand the fault condition.
Open the appropriate topology, based upon the ticket scenario.
Open the console of the desired device by clicking on that device in the topology, based upon your troubleshooting methodology.
Use the supported show, ping and trace commands to begin your fault isolation process.
Move to other devices as need by clicking on those devices within the topology.

Fault Identification -
The trouble ticket will include three questions that you will need to answer:
1. Which device contains the fault
2. Which technology the fault condition is related to
3. What is the solution to the issue
To advance to the next question within the ticket click on “Next Questionâ€.
When you click “DONEâ€, the trouble ticket will turn RED and will no longer be accessible.
You may also use the “Previous Question†button to review questions within that specific ticket.
To complete a trouble ticket, answer all three questions and click “DONEâ€. This will store your response to the questions. Do not click on “DONE†unless you have answered all questions within the ticket.

Item Completion -
Click the NEXT button on the bottom of the screen once a ticket is RED. This action moves you to the next item.
Topology Overview (Actual Troubleshooting lab design is for below network design)
Client Should have IP 10.2.1.3
EIGRP 100 is running between switch DSW1 & DSW2


OSPF (Process ID 1) is running between R1, R2, R3, R4
Network of OSPF is redistributed in EIGRP
BGP 65001 is configured on R1 with Webserver cloud AS 65002
HSRP is running between DSW1 & DSW2 Switches
The company has created the test bed shown in the layer 2 and layer 3 topology exhibits.
This network consists of four routers, two layer 3 switches and two layer 2 switches.
In the IPv4 layer 3 topology, R1, R2, R3, and R4 are running OSPF with an OSPF process number 1.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running EIGRP with an AS of 10. Redistribution is enabled where necessary.
R1 is running a BGP AS with a number of 65001. This AS has an eBGP connection to AS 65002 in the ISP’s network. Because the company’s address space is in the private range.
R1 is also providing NAT translations between the inside (10.1.0.0/16 & 10.2.0.0/16) networks and outside (209.65.0.0/24) network.
ASW1 and ASW2 are layer 2 switches.
NTP is enabled on all devices with 209.65.200.226 serving as the master clock source.
The client workstations receive their IP address and default gateway via R4’s DHCP server.
The default gateway address of 10.2.1.254 is the IP address of HSRP group 10 which is running on DSW1 and DSW2.
In the IPv6 layer 3 topology R1, R2, and R3 are running OSPFv3 with an OSPF process number 6.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running RIPng process name RIP_ZONE.
The two IPv6 routing domains, OSPF 6 and RIPng are connected via GRE tunnel running over the underlying IPv4 OSPF domain. Redistrution is enabled where necessary.
Recently the implementation group has been using the test bed to do a ‘proof-of-concept’ on several implementations. This involved changing the configuration on one or more of the devices. You will be presented with a series of trouble tickets related to issues introduced during these configurations.
Note: Although trouble tickets have many similar fault indications, each ticket has its own issue and solution.
Each ticket has 3 sub questions that need to be answered & topology remains same.
Fault is found on which device,

Question-1 -
Fault condition is related to,

Question-2 -
What exact problem is seen & what needs to be done for solution

Question-3 -
===============================================================================




The implementation group has been using the test bed to do an IPv6 'proof-of-concept1. After several changes to the network addressing and routing schemes, a trouble ticket has been opened indicating that the loopback address on R1 (2026::111:1) is not able to ping the loopback address on DSW2 (2026::102:1).
Use the supported commands to isolate the cause of this fault and answer the following question.
On which device is the fault condition located?

  • A. R1
  • B. R2
  • C. R3
  • D. R4
  • E. DSW1
  • F. DSW2
  • G. ASW1
  • H. ASW2


Answer : B

Explanation:
Start to troubleshoot this by pinging the loopback IPv6 address of DSW2 (2026::102:1). This can be pinged from DSW1, R4, and R3, which leads us to believe that the issue is with R2. Going further, we can see that R2 only has an IPV6 OSPF neighbor of R1, not R3:


We can then see that OSPFv3 has not been enabled on the interface to R3:

So the problem is with R2, related to IPV6 Routing, and the fix is to enable the “ipv6 ospf 6 area 0â€command under the serial 0/0/0.23 interface.

Instructions -
The main screen consists of two parts; the Main scenario and the Topology tabs. The main scenario describes TSHOOT.com test bed. The Topology tabs allow you to display the appropriate and select the trouble ticket.
To complete the item, you will first need to familiarize yourself with the TSHOOT.com test bed by clicking on the master scenario first and then the topologies tabs.
Once you are familiar with the test bed and the topologies, you should start evaluating the trouble ticket. You will be presented with a Trouble Ticket scenario that will describe the fault condition. You will need to determine on which device the fault condition is located, to which technology the fault condition is related, and the solution to each trouble ticket. This will be done by answering three questions.

Ticket Selection -
To begin, click on the Ticket on the Topology tabs.
Some of the questions will require you to use the scroll bar to see all options.
Please note.

Fault Isolation -
Read the ticket scenario to understand the fault condition.
Open the appropriate topology, based upon the ticket scenario.
Open the console of the desired device by clicking on that device in the topology, based upon your troubleshooting methodology.
Use the supported show, ping and trace commands to begin your fault isolation process.
Move to other devices as need by clicking on those devices within the topology.

Fault Identification -
The trouble ticket will include three questions that you will need to answer:
1. Which device contains the fault
2. Which technology the fault condition is related to
3. What is the solution to the issue
To advance to the next question within the ticket click on “Next Questionâ€.
When you click “DONEâ€, the trouble ticket will turn RED and will no longer be accessible.
You may also use the “Previous Question†button to review questions within that specific ticket.
To complete a trouble ticket, answer all three questions and click “DONEâ€. This will store your response to the questions. Do not click on “DONE†unless you have answered all questions within the ticket.

Item Completion -
Click the NEXT button on the bottom of the screen once a ticket is RED. This action moves you to the next item.
Topology Overview (Actual Troubleshooting lab design is for below network design)
Client Should have IP 10.2.1.3
EIGRP 100 is running between switch DSW1 & DSW2


OSPF (Process ID 1) is running between R1, R2, R3, R4
Network of OSPF is redistributed in EIGRP
BGP 65001 is configured on R1 with Webserver cloud AS 65002
HSRP is running between DSW1 & DSW2 Switches
The company has created the test bed shown in the layer 2 and layer 3 topology exhibits.
This network consists of four routers, two layer 3 switches and two layer 2 switches.
In the IPv4 layer 3 topology, R1, R2, R3, and R4 are running OSPF with an OSPF process number 1.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running EIGRP with an AS of 10. Redistribution is enabled where necessary.
R1 is running a BGP AS with a number of 65001. This AS has an eBGP connection to AS 65002 in the ISP’s network. Because the company’s address space is in the private range.
R1 is also providing NAT translations between the inside (10.1.0.0/16 & 10.2.0.0/16) networks and outside (209.65.0.0/24) network.
ASW1 and ASW2 are layer 2 switches.
NTP is enabled on all devices with 209.65.200.226 serving as the master clock source.
The client workstations receive their IP address and default gateway via R4’s DHCP server.
The default gateway address of 10.2.1.254 is the IP address of HSRP group 10 which is running on DSW1 and DSW2.
In the IPv6 layer 3 topology R1, R2, and R3 are running OSPFv3 with an OSPF process number 6.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running RIPng process name RIP_ZONE.
The two IPv6 routing domains, OSPF 6 and RIPng are connected via GRE tunnel running over the underlying IPv4 OSPF domain. Redistrution is enabled where necessary.
Recently the implementation group has been using the test bed to do a ‘proof-of-concept’ on several implementations. This involved changing the configuration on one or more of the devices. You will be presented with a series of trouble tickets related to issues introduced during these configurations.
Note: Although trouble tickets have many similar fault indications, each ticket has its own issue and solution.
Each ticket has 3 sub questions that need to be answered & topology remains same.
Fault is found on which device,

Question-1 -
Fault condition is related to,

Question-2 -
What exact problem is seen & what needs to be done for solution

Question-3 -
===============================================================================




The implementation group has been using the test bed to do an IPv6 'proof-of-concept1. After several changes to the network addressing and routing schemes, a trouble ticket has been opened indicating that the loopback address on R1 (2026::111:1) is not able to ping the loopback address on DSW2 (2026::102:1).
Use the supported commands to isolate the cause of this fault and answer the following question.
The fault condition is related to which technology?

  • A. NTP
  • B. IPv4 OSPF Routing
  • C. IPv6 OSPF Routing
  • D. IPv4 layer 3 security


Answer : B

Explanation:
Since we are unable to ping the IPv6 address, the problem is with IPv6 OSPF Routing.

Instructions -
The main screen consists of two parts; the Main scenario and the Topology tabs. The main scenario describes TSHOOT.com test bed. The Topology tabs allow you to display the appropriate and select the trouble ticket.
To complete the item, you will first need to familiarize yourself with the TSHOOT.com test bed by clicking on the master scenario first and then the topologies tabs.
Once you are familiar with the test bed and the topologies, you should start evaluating the trouble ticket. You will be presented with a Trouble Ticket scenario that will describe the fault condition. You will need to determine on which device the fault condition is located, to which technology the fault condition is related, and the solution to each trouble ticket. This will be done by answering three questions.

Ticket Selection -
To begin, click on the Ticket on the Topology tabs.
Some of the questions will require you to use the scroll bar to see all options.
Please note.

Fault Isolation -
Read the ticket scenario to understand the fault condition.
Open the appropriate topology, based upon the ticket scenario.
Open the console of the desired device by clicking on that device in the topology, based upon your troubleshooting methodology.
Use the supported show, ping and trace commands to begin your fault isolation process.
Move to other devices as need by clicking on those devices within the topology.

Fault Identification -
The trouble ticket will include three questions that you will need to answer:
1. Which device contains the fault
2. Which technology the fault condition is related to
3. What is the solution to the issue
To advance to the next question within the ticket click on “Next Questionâ€.
When you click “DONEâ€, the trouble ticket will turn RED and will no longer be accessible.
You may also use the “Previous Question†button to review questions within that specific ticket.
To complete a trouble ticket, answer all three questions and click “DONEâ€. This will store your response to the questions. Do not click on “DONE†unless you have answered all questions within the ticket.

Item Completion -
Click the NEXT button on the bottom of the screen once a ticket is RED. This action moves you to the next item.
Topology Overview (Actual Troubleshooting lab design is for below network design)
Client Should have IP 10.2.1.3
EIGRP 100 is running between switch DSW1 & DSW2


OSPF (Process ID 1) is running between R1, R2, R3, R4
Network of OSPF is redistributed in EIGRP
BGP 65001 is configured on R1 with Webserver cloud AS 65002
HSRP is running between DSW1 & DSW2 Switches
The company has created the test bed shown in the layer 2 and layer 3 topology exhibits.
This network consists of four routers, two layer 3 switches and two layer 2 switches.
In the IPv4 layer 3 topology, R1, R2, R3, and R4 are running OSPF with an OSPF process number 1.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running EIGRP with an AS of 10. Redistribution is enabled where necessary.
R1 is running a BGP AS with a number of 65001. This AS has an eBGP connection to AS 65002 in the ISP’s network. Because the company’s address space is in the private range.
R1 is also providing NAT translations between the inside (10.1.0.0/16 & 10.2.0.0/16) networks and outside (209.65.0.0/24) network.
ASW1 and ASW2 are layer 2 switches.
NTP is enabled on all devices with 209.65.200.226 serving as the master clock source.
The client workstations receive their IP address and default gateway via R4’s DHCP server.
The default gateway address of 10.2.1.254 is the IP address of HSRP group 10 which is running on DSW1 and DSW2.
In the IPv6 layer 3 topology R1, R2, and R3 are running OSPFv3 with an OSPF process number 6.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running RIPng process name RIP_ZONE.
The two IPv6 routing domains, OSPF 6 and RIPng are connected via GRE tunnel running over the underlying IPv4 OSPF domain. Redistrution is enabled where necessary.
Recently the implementation group has been using the test bed to do a ‘proof-of-concept’ on several implementations. This involved changing the configuration on one or more of the devices. You will be presented with a series of trouble tickets related to issues introduced during these configurations.
Note: Although trouble tickets have many similar fault indications, each ticket has its own issue and solution.
Each ticket has 3 sub questions that need to be answered & topology remains same.
Fault is found on which device,

Question-1 -
Fault condition is related to,

Question-2 -
What exact problem is seen & what needs to be done for solution

Question-3 -
===============================================================================




The implementation group has been using the test bed to do an IPv6 'proof-of-concept1. After several changes to the network addressing and routing schemes, a trouble ticket has been opened indicating that the loopback address on R1 (2026::111:1) is not able to ping the loopback address on DSW2 (2026::102:1).
Use the supported commands to isolate the cause of this fault and answer the following question.
What is the solution to the fault condition?

  • A. Under the interface SerialO/0/0.23 configuration enter the ipv6 ospf 6 area 0 command.
  • B. Under the interface SerialO/0/0.12 configuration enter the ipv6 ospf 6 area 12 command.
  • C. Under ipv6 router ospf 6 configuration enter the network 2026::1:/122 area 0 command.
  • D. Under ipv6 router ospf 6 configuration enter the no passive-interface default command


Answer : A

Explanation:
As explained in question one of this ticket, we can then see that OSPFv3 has not been enabled on the interface to R3:


So the problem is with R2, related to IPV6 Routing, and the fix is to enable the “ipv6 ospf 6 area 0â€command under the serial 0/0/0.23 interface. We need to enable this interface for area 0 according to the topology diagram.

Instructions -
The main screen consists of two parts; the Main scenario and the Topology tabs. The main scenario describes TSHOOT.com test bed. The Topology tabs allow you to display the appropriate and select the trouble ticket.
To complete the item, you will first need to familiarize yourself with the TSHOOT.com test bed by clicking on the master scenario first and then the topologies tabs.
Once you are familiar with the test bed and the topologies, you should start evaluating the trouble ticket. You will be presented with a Trouble Ticket scenario that will describe the fault condition. You will need to determine on which device the fault condition is located, to which technology the fault condition is related, and the solution to each trouble ticket. This will be done by answering three questions.

Ticket Selection -
To begin, click on the Ticket on the Topology tabs.
Some of the questions will require you to use the scroll bar to see all options.
Please note.

Fault Isolation -
Read the ticket scenario to understand the fault condition.
Open the appropriate topology, based upon the ticket scenario.
Open the console of the desired device by clicking on that device in the topology, based upon your troubleshooting methodology.
Use the supported show, ping and trace commands to begin your fault isolation process.
Move to other devices as need by clicking on those devices within the topology.

Fault Identification -
The trouble ticket will include three questions that you will need to answer:
1. Which device contains the fault
2. Which technology the fault condition is related to
3. What is the solution to the issue
To advance to the next question within the ticket click on “Next Questionâ€.
When you click “DONEâ€, the trouble ticket will turn RED and will no longer be accessible.
You may also use the “Previous Question†button to review questions within that specific ticket.
To complete a trouble ticket, answer all three questions and click “DONEâ€. This will store your response to the questions. Do not click on “DONE†unless you have answered all questions within the ticket.

Item Completion -
Click the NEXT button on the bottom of the screen once a ticket is RED. This action moves you to the next item.
Topology Overview (Actual Troubleshooting lab design is for below network design)
Client Should have IP 10.2.1.3
EIGRP 100 is running between switch DSW1 & DSW2


OSPF (Process ID 1) is running between R1, R2, R3, R4
Network of OSPF is redistributed in EIGRP
BGP 65001 is configured on R1 with Webserver cloud AS 65002
HSRP is running between DSW1 & DSW2 Switches
The company has created the test bed shown in the layer 2 and layer 3 topology exhibits.
This network consists of four routers, two layer 3 switches and two layer 2 switches.
In the IPv4 layer 3 topology, R1, R2, R3, and R4 are running OSPF with an OSPF process number 1.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running EIGRP with an AS of 10. Redistribution is enabled where necessary.
R1 is running a BGP AS with a number of 65001. This AS has an eBGP connection to AS 65002 in the ISP’s network. Because the company’s address space is in the private range.
R1 is also providing NAT translations between the inside (10.1.0.0/16 & 10.2.0.0/16) networks and outside (209.65.0.0/24) network.
ASW1 and ASW2 are layer 2 switches.
NTP is enabled on all devices with 209.65.200.226 serving as the master clock source.
The client workstations receive their IP address and default gateway via R4’s DHCP server.
The default gateway address of 10.2.1.254 is the IP address of HSRP group 10 which is running on DSW1 and DSW2.
In the IPv6 layer 3 topology R1, R2, and R3 are running OSPFv3 with an OSPF process number 6.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running RIPng process name RIP_ZONE.
The two IPv6 routing domains, OSPF 6 and RIPng are connected via GRE tunnel running over the underlying IPv4 OSPF domain. Redistribution is enabled where necessary.
Recently the implementation group has been using the test bed to do a ‘proof-of-concept’ on several implementations. This involved changing the configuration on one or more of the devices. You will be presented with a series of trouble tickets related to issues introduced during these configurations.
Note: Although trouble tickets have many similar fault indications, each ticket has its own issue and solution.
Each ticket has 3 sub questions that need to be answered & topology remains same.
Fault is found on which device,

Question-1 -
Fault condition is related to,

Question-2 -
What exact problem is seen & what needs to be done for solution

Question-3 -




The implementation group has been using the test bed to do an IPv6 'proof-of-concept1. After several changes to the network addressing and routing schemes, a trouble ticket has been opened indicating that the loopback address on R1 (2026::111:1) is not able to ping the loopback address on DSW2 (2026::102:1).
Use the supported commands to isolate the cause of this fault and answer the following question.
On which device is the fault condition located?

  • A. R1
  • B. R2
  • C. R3
  • D. R4
  • E. DSW1
  • F. DSW2
  • G. ASW1
  • H. ASW2 D


Answer : Explanation

Explanation:
Start to troubleshoot this by pinging the loopback IPv6 address of DSW2 (2026::102:1). This can be pinged from DSW1, and R4, but not R3 or any other devices past that point. If we look at the diagram, we see that R4 is redistributing the OSPF and RIP IPV6 routes. However, looking at the routing table we see that R4 has the 2026::102 network in the routing table known via RIP, but that R3 does not have the route:



When we look more closely at the configuration of R4, we see that it is redistributing OSPF routes into RIP for IPv6, but the RIP routes are not being redistributed into OSPF. That is why R3 sees R4 as an IPV6 OSPF neighbor, but does not get the 2026::102 network installed.

So, problem is with route redistribution on R4.

Instructions -
The main screen consists of two parts; the Main scenario and the Topology tabs. The main scenario describes TSHOOT.com test bed. The Topology tabs allow you to display the appropriate and select the trouble ticket.
To complete the item, you will first need to familiarize yourself with the TSHOOT.com test bed by clicking on the master scenario first and then the topologies tabs.
Once you are familiar with the test bed and the topologies, you should start evaluating the trouble ticket. You will be presented with a Trouble Ticket scenario that will describe the fault condition. You will need to determine on which device the fault condition is located, to which technology the fault condition is related, and the solution to each trouble ticket. This will be done by answering three questions.

Ticket Selection -
To begin, click on the Ticket on the Topology tabs.
Some of the questions will require you to use the scroll bar to see all options.
Please note.

Fault Isolation -
Read the ticket scenario to understand the fault condition.
Open the appropriate topology, based upon the ticket scenario.
Open the console of the desired device by clicking on that device in the topology, based upon your troubleshooting methodology.
Use the supported show, ping and trace commands to begin your fault isolation process.
Move to other devices as need by clicking on those devices within the topology.

Fault Identification -
The trouble ticket will include three questions that you will need to answer:
1. Which device contains the fault
2. Which technology the fault condition is related to
3. What is the solution to the issue
To advance to the next question within the ticket click on “Next Questionâ€.
When you click “DONEâ€, the trouble ticket will turn RED and will no longer be accessible.
You may also use the “Previous Question†button to review questions within that specific ticket.
To complete a trouble ticket, answer all three questions and click “DONEâ€. This will store your response to the questions. Do not click on “DONE†unless you have answered all questions within the ticket.

Item Completion -
Click the NEXT button on the bottom of the screen once a ticket is RED. This action moves you to the next item.
Topology Overview (Actual Troubleshooting lab design is for below network design)
Client Should have IP 10.2.1.3
EIGRP 100 is running between switch DSW1 & DSW2


OSPF (Process ID 1) is running between R1, R2, R3, R4
Network of OSPF is redistributed in EIGRP
BGP 65001 is configured on R1 with Webserver cloud AS 65002
HSRP is running between DSW1 & DSW2 Switches
The company has created the test bed shown in the layer 2 and layer 3 topology exhibits.
This network consists of four routers, two layer 3 switches and two layer 2 switches.
In the IPv4 layer 3 topology, R1, R2, R3, and R4 are running OSPF with an OSPF process number 1.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running EIGRP with an AS of 10. Redistribution is enabled where necessary.
R1 is running a BGP AS with a number of 65001. This AS has an eBGP connection to AS 65002 in the ISP’s network. Because the company’s address space is in the private range.
R1 is also providing NAT translations between the inside (10.1.0.0/16 & 10.2.0.0/16) networks and outside (209.65.0.0/24) network.
ASW1 and ASW2 are layer 2 switches.
NTP is enabled on all devices with 209.65.200.226 serving as the master clock source.
The client workstations receive their IP address and default gateway via R4’s DHCP server.
The default gateway address of 10.2.1.254 is the IP address of HSRP group 10 which is running on DSW1 and DSW2.
In the IPv6 layer 3 topology R1, R2, and R3 are running OSPFv3 with an OSPF process number 6.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running RIPng process name RIP_ZONE.
The two IPv6 routing domains, OSPF 6 and RIPng are connected via GRE tunnel running over the underlying IPv4 OSPF domain. Redistribution is enabled where necessary.
Recently the implementation group has been using the test bed to do a ‘proof-of-concept’ on several implementations. This involved changing the configuration on one or more of the devices. You will be presented with a series of trouble tickets related to issues introduced during these configurations.
Note: Although trouble tickets have many similar fault indications, each ticket has its own issue and solution.
Each ticket has 3 sub questions that need to be answered & topology remains same.
Fault is found on which device,

Question-1 -
Fault condition is related to,

Question-2 -
What exact problem is seen & what needs to be done for solution

Question-3 -




The implementation group has been using the test bed to do an IPv6 'proof-of-concept'. After several changes to the network addressing and routing schemes, a trouble ticket has been opened indicating that the loopback address on R1 (2026::111:1) is not able to ping the loopback address on DSW2 (2026::102:1).
Use the supported commands to isolate the cause of this fault and answer the following question.
The fault condition is related to which technology?

  • A. NTP
  • B. IP DHCP Server
  • C. IPv4 OSPF Routing
  • D. IPv4 EIGRP Routing
  • E. IPv4 Route Redistribution
  • F. IPv6 RIP Routing
  • G. IPv6 OSPF Routing
  • H. IPV4 and IPV6 Interoperability
  • I. IPv4 layer 3 security


Answer : G

Explanation:
As explained earlier, the problem is with route redistribution on R4 of not redistributing RIP routes into OSPF for IPV6.

Instructions -
The main screen consists of two parts; the Main scenario and the Topology tabs. The main scenario describes TSHOOT.com test bed. The Topology tabs allow you to display the appropriate and select the trouble ticket.
To complete the item, you will first need to familiarize yourself with the TSHOOT.com test bed by clicking on the master scenario first and then the topologies tabs.
Once you are familiar with the test bed and the topologies, you should start evaluating the trouble ticket. You will be presented with a Trouble Ticket scenario that will describe the fault condition. You will need to determine on which device the fault condition is located, to which technology the fault condition is related, and the solution to each trouble ticket. This will be done by answering three questions.

Ticket Selection -
To begin, click on the Ticket on the Topology tabs.
Some of the questions will require you to use the scroll bar to see all options.
Please note.

Fault Isolation -
Read the ticket scenario to understand the fault condition.
Open the appropriate topology, based upon the ticket scenario.
Open the console of the desired device by clicking on that device in the topology, based upon your troubleshooting methodology.
Use the supported show, ping and trace commands to begin your fault isolation process.
Move to other devices as need by clicking on those devices within the topology.

Fault Identification -
The trouble ticket will include three questions that you will need to answer:
1. Which device contains the fault
2. Which technology the fault condition is related to
3. What is the solution to the issue
To advance to the next question within the ticket click on “Next Questionâ€.
When you click “DONEâ€, the trouble ticket will turn RED and will no longer be accessible.
You may also use the “Previous Question†button to review questions within that specific ticket.
To complete a trouble ticket, answer all three questions and click “DONEâ€. This will store your response to the questions. Do not click on “DONE†unless you have answered all questions within the ticket.

Item Completion -
Click the NEXT button on the bottom of the screen once a ticket is RED. This action moves you to the next item.
Topology Overview (Actual Troubleshooting lab design is for below network design)
Client Should have IP 10.2.1.3
EIGRP 100 is running between switch DSW1 & DSW2


OSPF (Process ID 1) is running between R1, R2, R3, R4
Network of OSPF is redistributed in EIGRP
BGP 65001 is configured on R1 with Webserver cloud AS 65002
HSRP is running between DSW1 & DSW2 Switches
The company has created the test bed shown in the layer 2 and layer 3 topology exhibits.
This network consists of four routers, two layer 3 switches and two layer 2 switches.
In the IPv4 layer 3 topology, R1, R2, R3, and R4 are running OSPF with an OSPF process number 1.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running EIGRP with an AS of 10. Redistribution is enabled where necessary.
R1 is running a BGP AS with a number of 65001. This AS has an eBGP connection to AS 65002 in the ISP’s network. Because the company’s address space is in the private range.
R1 is also providing NAT translations between the inside (10.1.0.0/16 & 10.2.0.0/16) networks and outside (209.65.0.0/24) network.
ASW1 and ASW2 are layer 2 switches.
NTP is enabled on all devices with 209.65.200.226 serving as the master clock source.
The client workstations receive their IP address and default gateway via R4’s DHCP server.
The default gateway address of 10.2.1.254 is the IP address of HSRP group 10 which is running on DSW1 and DSW2.
In the IPv6 layer 3 topology R1, R2, and R3 are running OSPFv3 with an OSPF process number 6.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running RIPng process name RIP_ZONE.
The two IPv6 routing domains, OSPF 6 and RIPng are connected via GRE tunnel running over the underlying IPv4 OSPF domain. Redistribution is enabled where necessary.
Recently the implementation group has been using the test bed to do a ‘proof-of-concept’ on several implementations. This involved changing the configuration on one or more of the devices. You will be presented with a series of trouble tickets related to issues introduced during these configurations.
Note: Although trouble tickets have many similar fault indications, each ticket has its own issue and solution.
Each ticket has 3 sub questions that need to be answered & topology remains same.
Fault is found on which device,

Question-1 -
Fault condition is related to,

Question-2 -
What exact problem is seen & what needs to be done for solution

Question-3 -




The implementation group has been using the test bed to do an IPv6 'proof-of-concept1. After several changes to the network addressing and routing schemes, a trouble ticket has been opened indicating that the loopback address on R1 (2026::111:1) is not able to ping the loopback address on DSW2 (2026::102:1).
Use the supported commands to isolate the cause of this fault and answer the following question.
What is the solution to the fault condition?

  • A. Under the interface Tunnel34 configuration enter the ipv6 ospf 6 area 34 command.
  • B. Under the interface Loopback6 configuration enter the ipv6 ospf 6 area 34 command.
  • C. Under the interface Serial0/0/0.34 configuration enter the ipv6 ospf 6 area 34 command.
  • D. Under ipv6 router ospf 6 configuration enter the redistribute rip RIP_ZONE include-connected command.


Answer : D

Explanation:
As explained earlier, the problem is with route redistribution on R4 of not redistributing RIP routes into OSPF for IPV6.

Instructions -
The main screen consists of two parts; the Main scenario and the Topology tabs. The main scenario describes TSHOOT.com test bed. The Topology tabs allow you to display the appropriate and select the trouble ticket.
To complete the item, you will first need to familiarize yourself with the TSHOOT.com test bed by clicking on the master scenario first and then the topologies tabs.
Once you are familiar with the test bed and the topologies, you should start evaluating the trouble ticket. You will be presented with a Trouble Ticket scenario that will describe the fault condition. You will need to determine on which device the fault condition is located, to which technology the fault condition is related, and the solution to each trouble ticket. This will be done by answering three questions.

Ticket Selection -
To begin, click on the Ticket on the Topology tabs.
Some of the questions will require you to use the scroll bar to see all options.
Please note.

Fault Isolation -
Read the ticket scenario to understand the fault condition.
Open the appropriate topology, based upon the ticket scenario.
Open the console of the desired device by clicking on that device in the topology, based upon your troubleshooting methodology.
Use the supported show, ping and trace commands to begin your fault isolation process.
Move to other devices as need by clicking on those devices within the topology.

Fault Identification -
The trouble ticket will include three questions that you will need to answer:
1. Which device contains the fault
2. Which technology the fault condition is related to
3. What is the solution to the issue
To advance to the next question within the ticket click on “Next Questionâ€.
When you click “DONEâ€, the trouble ticket will turn RED and will no longer be accessible.
You may also use the “Previous Question†button to review questions within that specific ticket.
To complete a trouble ticket, answer all three questions and click “DONEâ€. This will store your response to the questions. Do not click on “DONE†unless you have answered all questions within the ticket.

Item Completion -
Click the NEXT button on the bottom of the screen once a ticket is RED. This action moves you to the next item.
Topology Overview (Actual Troubleshooting lab design is for below network design)
Client Should have IP 10.2.1.3
EIGRP 100 is running between switch DSW1 & DSW2


OSPF (Process ID 1) is running between R1, R2, R3, R4
Network of OSPF is redistributed in EIGRP
BGP 65001 is configured on R1 with Webserver cloud AS 65002
HSRP is running between DSW1 & DSW2 Switches
The company has created the test bed shown in the layer 2 and layer 3 topology exhibits.
This network consists of four routers, two layer 3 switches and two layer 2 switches.
In the IPv4 layer 3 topology, R1, R2, R3, and R4 are running OSPF with an OSPF process number 1.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running EIGRP with an AS of 10. Redistribution is enabled where necessary.
R1 is running a BGP AS with a number of 65001. This AS has an eBGP connection to AS 65002 in the ISP’s network. Because the company’s address space is in the private range.
R1 is also providing NAT translations between the inside (10.1.0.0/16 & 10.2.0.0/16) networks and outside (209.65.0.0/24) network.
ASW1 and ASW2 are layer 2 switches.
NTP is enabled on all devices with 209.65.200.226 serving as the master clock source.
The client workstations receive their IP address and default gateway via R4’s DHCP server.
The default gateway address of 10.2.1.254 is the IP address of HSRP group 10 which is running on DSW1 and DSW2.
In the IPv6 layer 3 topology R1, R2, and R3 are running OSPFv3 with an OSPF process number 6.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running RIPng process name RIP_ZONE.
The two IPv6 routing domains, OSPF 6 and RIPng are connected via GRE tunnel running over the underlying IPv4 OSPF domain. Redistrution is enabled where necessary.
Recently the implementation group has been using the test bed to do a ‘proof-of-concept’ on several implementations. This involved changing the configuration on one or more of the devices. You will be presented with a series of trouble tickets related to issues introduced during these configurations.
Note: Although trouble tickets have many similar fault indications, each ticket has its own issue and solution.
Each ticket has 3 sub questions that need to be answered & topology remains same.
Fault is found on which device,

Question-1 -
Fault condition is related to,

Question-2 -
What exact problem is seen & what needs to be done for solution

Question-3 -
===============================================================================




The implementation group has been using the test bed to do an IPv6 'proof-of-concept1. After several changes to the network addressing and routing schemes, a trouble ticket has been opened indicating that the loopback address on R1 (2026::111:1) is not able to ping the loopback address on DSW2 (2026::102:1).
Use the supported commands to isolate the cause of this fault and answer the following question.
On which device is the fault condition located?

  • A. R1
  • B. R2
  • C. R3
  • D. R4
  • E. DSW1
  • F. DSW2
  • G. ASW1
  • H. ASW2


Answer : C

Explanation:
Start to troubleshoot this by pinging the loopback IPv6 address of DSW2 (2026::102:1). This can be pinged from DSW1, and R4, but not R3 or any other devices past that point. If we look at the routing table of R3, we see that there is no OSPF neighbor to R4:


This is due to mismatched tunnel modes between R3 and R4:

Problem is with R3, and to resolve the issue we should delete the “tunnel mode ipv6†under interface Tunnel 34.

Instructions -
The main screen consists of two parts; the Main scenario and the Topology tabs. The main scenario describes TSHOOT.com test bed. The Topology tabs allow you to display the appropriate and select the trouble ticket.
To complete the item, you will first need to familiarize yourself with the TSHOOT.com test bed by clicking on the master scenario first and then the topologies tabs.
Once you are familiar with the test bed and the topologies, you should start evaluating the trouble ticket. You will be presented with a Trouble Ticket scenario that will describe the fault condition. You will need to determine on which device the fault condition is located, to which technology the fault condition is related, and the solution to each trouble ticket. This will be done by answering three questions.

Ticket Selection -
To begin, click on the Ticket on the Topology tabs.
Some of the questions will require you to use the scroll bar to see all options.
Please note.

Fault Isolation -
Read the ticket scenario to understand the fault condition.
Open the appropriate topology, based upon the ticket scenario.
Open the console of the desired device by clicking on that device in the topology, based upon your troubleshooting methodology.
Use the supported show, ping and trace commands to begin your fault isolation process.
Move to other devices as need by clicking on those devices within the topology.

Fault Identification -
The trouble ticket will include three questions that you will need to answer:
1. Which device contains the fault
2. Which technology the fault condition is related to
3. What is the solution to the issue
To advance to the next question within the ticket click on “Next Questionâ€.
When you click “DONEâ€, the trouble ticket will turn RED and will no longer be accessible.
You may also use the “Previous Question†button to review questions within that specific ticket.
To complete a trouble ticket, answer all three questions and click “DONEâ€. This will store your response to the questions. Do not click on “DONE†unless you have answered all questions within the ticket.

Item Completion -
Click the NEXT button on the bottom of the screen once a ticket is RED. This action moves you to the next item.
Topology Overview (Actual Troubleshooting lab design is for below network design)
Client Should have IP 10.2.1.3
EIGRP 100 is running between switch DSW1 & DSW2


OSPF (Process ID 1) is running between R1, R2, R3, R4
Network of OSPF is redistributed in EIGRP
BGP 65001 is configured on R1 with Webserver cloud AS 65002
HSRP is running between DSW1 & DSW2 Switches
The company has created the test bed shown in the layer 2 and layer 3 topology exhibits.
This network consists of four routers, two layer 3 switches and two layer 2 switches.
In the IPv4 layer 3 topology, R1, R2, R3, and R4 are running OSPF with an OSPF process number 1.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running EIGRP with an AS of 10. Redistribution is enabled where necessary.
R1 is running a BGP AS with a number of 65001. This AS has an eBGP connection to AS 65002 in the ISP’s network. Because the company’s address space is in the private range.
R1 is also providing NAT translations between the inside (10.1.0.0/16 & 10.2.0.0/16) networks and outside (209.65.0.0/24) network.
ASW1 and ASW2 are layer 2 switches.
NTP is enabled on all devices with 209.65.200.226 serving as the master clock source.
The client workstations receive their IP address and default gateway via R4’s DHCP server.
The default gateway address of 10.2.1.254 is the IP address of HSRP group 10 which is running on DSW1 and DSW2.
In the IPv6 layer 3 topology R1, R2, and R3 are running OSPFv3 with an OSPF process number 6.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running RIPng process name RIP_ZONE.
The two IPv6 routing domains, OSPF 6 and RIPng are connected via GRE tunnel running over the underlying IPv4 OSPF domain. Redistrution is enabled where necessary.
Recently the implementation group has been using the test bed to do a ‘proof-of-concept’ on several implementations. This involved changing the configuration on one or more of the devices. You will be presented with a series of trouble tickets related to issues introduced during these configurations.
Note: Although trouble tickets have many similar fault indications, each ticket has its own issue and solution.
Each ticket has 3 sub questions that need to be answered & topology remains same.
Fault is found on which device,

Question-1 -
Fault condition is related to,

Question-2 -
What exact problem is seen & what needs to be done for solution

Question-3 -
===============================================================================




The implementation group has been using the test bed to do an IPv6 'proof-of-concept1. After several changes to the network addressing and routing schemes, a trouble ticket has been opened indicating that the loopback address on R1 (2026::111:1) is not able to ping the loopback address on DSW2 (2026::102:1).
Use the supported commands to isolate the cause of this fault and answer the following question.
The fault condition is related to which technology?

  • A. NTP
  • B. IPv4 OSPF Routing
  • C. IPv6 OSPF Routing
  • D. IPV4 and IPV6 Interoperability
  • E. IPv4 layer 3 security


Answer : Answer: D

Explanation:
As explained earlier, the problem is with route misconfigured tunnel modes on R3. R3 is using tunnel mode ipv6, while R4 is using the default of GRE.

Instructions -
The main screen consists of two parts; the Main scenario and the Topology tabs. The main scenario describes TSHOOT.com test bed. The Topology tabs allow you to display the appropriate and select the trouble ticket.
To complete the item, you will first need to familiarize yourself with the TSHOOT.com test bed by clicking on the master scenario first and then the topologies tabs.
Once you are familiar with the test bed and the topologies, you should start evaluating the trouble ticket. You will be presented with a Trouble Ticket scenario that will describe the fault condition. You will need to determine on which device the fault condition is located, to which technology the fault condition is related, and the solution to each trouble ticket. This will be done by answering three questions.

Ticket Selection -
To begin, click on the Ticket on the Topology tabs.
Some of the questions will require you to use the scroll bar to see all options.
Please note.

Fault Isolation -
Read the ticket scenario to understand the fault condition.
Open the appropriate topology, based upon the ticket scenario.
Open the console of the desired device by clicking on that device in the topology, based upon your troubleshooting methodology.
Use the supported show, ping and trace commands to begin your fault isolation process.
Move to other devices as need by clicking on those devices within the topology.

Fault Identification -
The trouble ticket will include three questions that you will need to answer:
1. Which device contains the fault
2. Which technology the fault condition is related to
3. What is the solution to the issue
To advance to the next question within the ticket click on “Next Questionâ€.
When you click “DONEâ€, the trouble ticket will turn RED and will no longer be accessible.
You may also use the “Previous Question†button to review questions within that specific ticket.
To complete a trouble ticket, answer all three questions and click “DONEâ€. This will store your response to the questions. Do not click on “DONE†unless you have answered all questions within the ticket.

Item Completion -
Click the NEXT button on the bottom of the screen once a ticket is RED. This action moves you to the next item.
Topology Overview (Actual Troubleshooting lab design is for below network design)
Client Should have IP 10.2.1.3
EIGRP 100 is running between switch DSW1 & DSW2


OSPF (Process ID 1) is running between R1, R2, R3, R4
Network of OSPF is redistributed in EIGRP
BGP 65001 is configured on R1 with Webserver cloud AS 65002
HSRP is running between DSW1 & DSW2 Switches
The company has created the test bed shown in the layer 2 and layer 3 topology exhibits.
This network consists of four routers, two layer 3 switches and two layer 2 switches.
In the IPv4 layer 3 topology, R1, R2, R3, and R4 are running OSPF with an OSPF process number 1.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running EIGRP with an AS of 10. Redistribution is enabled where necessary.
R1 is running a BGP AS with a number of 65001. This AS has an eBGP connection to AS 65002 in the ISP’s network. Because the company’s address space is in the private range.
R1 is also providing NAT translations between the inside (10.1.0.0/16 & 10.2.0.0/16) networks and outside (209.65.0.0/24) network.
ASW1 and ASW2 are layer 2 switches.
NTP is enabled on all devices with 209.65.200.226 serving as the master clock source.
The client workstations receive their IP address and default gateway via R4’s DHCP server.
The default gateway address of 10.2.1.254 is the IP address of HSRP group 10 which is running on DSW1 and DSW2.
In the IPv6 layer 3 topology R1, R2, and R3 are running OSPFv3 with an OSPF process number 6.
DSW1, DSW2 and R4 are running RIPng process name RIP_ZONE.
The two IPv6 routing domains, OSPF 6 and RIPng are connected via GRE tunnel running over the underlying IPv4 OSPF domain. Redistrution is enabled where necessary.
Recently the implementation group has been using the test bed to do a ‘proof-of-concept’ on several implementations. This involved changing the configuration on one or more of the devices. You will be presented with a series of trouble tickets related to issues introduced during these configurations.
Note: Although trouble tickets have many similar fault indications, each ticket has its own issue and solution.
Each ticket has 3 sub questions that need to be answered & topology remains same.
Fault is found on which device,

Question-1 -
Fault condition is related to,

Question-2 -
What exact problem is seen & what needs to be done for solution

Question-3 -
===============================================================================




The implementation group has been using the test bed to do an IPv6 'proof-of-concept1. After several changes to the network addressing and routing schemes, a trouble ticket has been opened indicating that the loopback address on R1 (2026::111:1) is not able to ping the loopback address on DSW2 (2026::102:1).
Use the supported commands to isolate the cause of this fault and answer the following question.
What is the solution to the fault condition?

  • A. Under the interface Tunnel34 configuration delete the tunnel mode ipv6 command.
  • B. Under the interface Serial0/0/0.34 configuration enter the ipv6 address 2026::34:1/122 command.
  • C. Under the interface Tunnel34 configuration enter the ip address unnumbered Serial0/0/0.34 command.
  • D. Under the interface Tunnel34 configuration delete the tunnel source Serial0/0/0.34 command and enter the tunnel source 2026::34:1/122 command.


Answer : A

Explanation:
As explained earlier, the problem is with route misconfigured tunnel modes on R3. R3 is using tunnel mode ipv6, while R4 is using the default of GRE. We need to remove the “tunnel mode ipv6†command under interface Tunnel34

Exhibit:


A network administrator is troubleshooting an EIGRP connection between RouterA, IP address 10.1.2.1, and RouterB, IP address 10.1.2.2. Given the debug output on RouterA, which two statements are true? (Choose two.)

  • A. RouterA received a hello packet with mismatched autonomous system numbers.
  • B. RouterA received a hello packet with mismatched hello timers.
  • C. RouterA received a hello packet with mismatched authentication parameters.
  • D. RouterA received a hello packet with mismatched metric-calculation mechanisms.
  • E. RouterA will form an adjacency with RouterB.
  • F. RouterA will not form an adjacency with RouterB.


Answer : DF

When troubleshooting an EIGRP connectivity problem, you notice that two connected EIGRP routers are not becoming EIGRP neighbors. A ping between the two routers was successful. What is the next thing that should be checked?

  • A. Verify that the EIGRP hello and hold timers match exactly.
  • B. Verify that EIGRP broadcast packets are not being dropped between the two routers with the show ip EIGRP peer command.
  • C. Verify that EIGRP broadcast packets are not being dropped between the two routers with the show ip EIGRP traffic command.
  • D. Verify that EIGRP is enabled for the appropriate networks on the local and neighboring router.


Answer : D

Refer to the exhibit.


How would you confirm on R1 that load balancing is actually occurring on the default-network (0.0.0.0)?

  • A. Use ping and the show ip route command to confirm the timers for each default network resets to 0.
  • B. Load balancing does not occur over default networks; the second route will only be used for failover.
  • C. Use an extended ping along with repeated show ip route commands to confirm the gateway of last resort address toggles back and forth.
  • D. Use the traceroute command to an address that is not explicitly in the routing table.


Answer : D

Which IPsec mode will encrypt a GRE tunnel to provide multiprotocol support and reduced overhead?

  • A. 3DES
  • B. multipoint GRE
  • C. tunnel
  • D. transport


Answer : D

Which three features are benefits of using GRE tunnels in conjunction with IPsec for building site-to-site VPNs? (Choose three.)

  • A. allows dynamic routing over the tunnel
  • B. supports multi-protocol (non-IP) traffic over the tunnel
  • C. reduces IPsec headers overhead since tunnel mode is used
  • D. simplifies the ACL used in the crypto map
  • E. uses Virtual Tunnel Interface (VTI) to simplify the IPsec VPN configuration


Answer : ABD

Which statement is true about an IPsec/GRE tunnel?

  • A. The GRE tunnel source and destination addresses are specified within the IPsec transform set.
  • B. An IPsec/GRE tunnel must use IPsec tunnel mode.
  • C. GRE encapsulation occurs before the IPsec encryption process.
  • D. Crypto map ACL is not needed to match which traffic will be protected.


Answer : C

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Total 147 questions